name of medication

January 28, 2010

Hull Construction – Twaron, Kevlar, Chopped Mat, Roving, Vinylester, Epoxy Resin, Airex, Balsa

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 2:09 pm

Fiberglass is made of fibers composed into fabrics then layered with resins. Between layers of fiberglass, sometimes builders use a core material. Continue reading “Hull Construction – Twaron, Kevlar, Chopped Mat, Roving, Vinylester, Epoxy Resin, Airex, Balsa” »

January 27, 2010

Gulfstar 50 Review: Affordable Three Stateroom Classic

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: , , — Richard Jordan @ 1:22 pm

Gulfstar 50 Color PDF Brochure (Click to Download)

The Gulfstar 50 is one of Lazzara’s best designs. Lazzara previously was a partner at Columbia yachts who produced another well know 50-footer, the Columbia 50. The Gulfstar 50 is a lot of boat for under $200,000 these days and attracts a certain degree of interest. The combination of a 50 foot boat with a three stateroom layout for sometimes below $100,000 is one of those golden combination in a brokerage boat. There are always a large number of clients looking for a 50-foot boat for around $100,000. Gulfstar has a confusing reputation. Ask some people and they’ll lambast the builder for shoddy layup and bathtub designs. Ask others, and they’ll praise the skill and quality of Gulfstar. This inconsistency is a facet of the diametric divisions in Gulfstar’s history. For the first five years in 1970-1975, they built cheap, floating bathtubs. If you wanted a sailboat, they would step a mast. In the late 1970’s, Vince Lazzara jibed and produced high-quality, performance sailboats. These performance yachts include the 50 along with the 60 and 44. Continue reading “Gulfstar 50 Review: Affordable Three Stateroom Classic” »

January 26, 2010

Gulfstar 44 Review: One of the Best Designs Ever

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: , , — Richard Jordan @ 4:27 pm

Gulfstar 44 PDF Brochure (Click to Download)

Vince Lazzara was not a beginner when he started Gulfstar in 1970. He had previously co-owned Columbia Yachts. Lazzara keenly knew what would sell and big bathtub motorsailers were in demand in the early 1970’s. If you wanted a powerboat, they pumped out an early Gulfstar. If you wanted a sailboat, they would stick on a mast like the 53 motorsailer which doubled as a displacement trawler. Gulfstar produced roomy motorsailers in their Tampa Bay factory. Around 1978 when consumer tastes changed so did Gulfstar. Lazzara switched to producing high performance sailboats. There is confusion with the 44 Gulfstar because they produced an early 1970’s motorsailer version. The early 1980’s Gulfstar 44 CC is a whole different animal and one these performance designs.

John Kretschmer, a former Hylas skipper, said one time to me about the Gulfstar 44, “You know that’s a great design. I’m as connected to Hylas as anybody but I’d say the Gulfstar 44 is a better design than the Hylas 44. It’s the boat everybody’s looking for. Add a few more portholes to get more light in the interior and…I can’t think of a better design.” Lazzara was a master of beauty above, speed below, and comfort inside. You’ll find these with either an athwartship king or centerline queen aft. The step down U-shaped galley is seaworthy with great headroom. If you are looking at 44 Peterson or 44 Hylases, you might also consider the 44 Gulfstar. Continue reading “Gulfstar 44 Review: One of the Best Designs Ever” »

January 22, 2010

Boat Tankage – Bladder, Monel, Fiberglass, Polyethelene, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Black Iron

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 10:10 am

Boats have fuel, water, and holding tanks. The general materials are fiberglass, plastic, and metal. Continue reading “Boat Tankage – Bladder, Monel, Fiberglass, Polyethelene, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Black Iron” »

January 13, 2010

Rigging – Swage Fitting, Stay Lock, Norseman Fittings, Swageless

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 1:53 pm

To attach wire rigging to the chainplates, you use fittings whether swage or swageless. Examples of swageless fittings include Stay Lock (Sta-Lok) and Norseman. Continue reading “Rigging – Swage Fitting, Stay Lock, Norseman Fittings, Swageless” »

January 12, 2010

Hull Deck Joint – Inward Outward Flange, Chemically Bonded, Fiberglass Tabbing, Bolted

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , — Richard Jordan @ 3:25 pm
Various Hull Deck Joints (Understanding Boat Design by Ted Brewer)

Various Hull Deck Joints (Understanding Boat Design by Ted Brewer)

The hull to deck joint is where the fiberglass pieces from hull and deck molds combine. The joint is a vulnerable area for leaks on older boats. Generally, three types of joints are inward flange, outward flange, and shoebox. Ways of securing the joint include bolting, chemical bonding, and fiberglass tabbing. Continue reading “Hull Deck Joint – Inward Outward Flange, Chemically Bonded, Fiberglass Tabbing, Bolted” »

December 27, 2009

Bayfield 36 Review: Classic Marathon Runner

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: , , , — Richard Jordan @ 11:37 am

Bayfield 36 PDF Brochure (Click to Download)

Certain styles never go away. There is always the lure of the pirate ships of old with their trailboards, bowsprits, and clipper bows. And at every sailor’s essence are certain pirate ideas, the romance of adventures on the high seas. The look speaks of journeys to far off lands for exciting adventures. That is what the Bayfield and now Gozzard Yachts stand for. In 1970, Ted and Hayden Gozzard started Bayfield Yachts in a yard in Bayfield, Ontario, Canada. Their first offering was a Bayfield 25. The company became synonymous with the classic, clipper bow look in Canada. They followed the Canadian innovations of C&C using balsa cored fiberglass. In 1981, Ted left the company to found his own builder, Gozzard Yachts. Hayden stayed on and in 1985 designed his first and only Bayfield, the 36. Ted continues to run Gozzard Yachts with his sons while the Bayfield factory burned down in 1988 halting production. These 36-footers have an excellent reputation in Canada, more well known than here in the USA. Her interior is arguably the largest you will find on a 36-foot sailboat. The roomy accommodations combined with her offshore sailing pedigree make her one of the best choices around in this range for a serious offshore yacht. Continue reading “Bayfield 36 Review: Classic Marathon Runner” »

December 26, 2009

Allied XL-2 42 Review: Overbuilt Dainty CCA Design

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: , , — Richard Jordan @ 11:44 am

Allied 42 PDF Brochure (Click to Download)

She’ll cross an ocean if you will. – Allied Boat Moto

In 1960, Thomas Gillmer (later of Southern Cross fame) designed a 30′ sailboat in this new fiberglass material. The design caught the builder’s eye, Lunn Laminates. After building the design for the purchaser Rex Kaiser, Lunn Laminates shopped around for funding to do a production run of these boats. On February 2, 1962, they partnered with Northrop & Johnson, a brokerage, and Thor Ramsing, a wealthy racer to form Allied Boat Company. Headquarters and yard were in Catskill, NY on a nice property on the water. Allied’s reputation grew with the famous circumnavigations of Alan Eddy and Robin Lee Graham. In 1964, Apogee, an Allied Seawind, became the first fiberglass sailboat around the world. In 1970, an Allied Luders carried the first solo fiberglass circumnavigator home. Sparkman & Stephens designed the Allied XL-2 42. Four different ownership groups built her from her launch in 1969 until Allied went out of business in 1982. One owner explaining her attraction says, “You know what the attraction is? She’s the equivalent of a 1960 Corvette.” Continue reading “Allied XL-2 42 Review: Overbuilt Dainty CCA Design” »

December 25, 2009

Van de Stadt Review

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: — Richard Jordan @ 11:49 am
Ricus Van de Stadt

Ricus Van de Stadt

In the 1930’s, Ricus Van de Stadt bought a yard and opened a design studio in the Netherlands. A door manufacturer Bruynzeel fabricated a superior form of plywood called hechthout. The plywood was particularly suited for making sailboats. In 1939, Ricus designed the Valk and using the hechthout plywood built her in his yard. She was an instant and enduring success. In the Netherlands today, the Valk is still the most popular open sailboat design. Some of the original production 70 years later are still sailing. Van de Stadt ever an innovator continued seeking the next big improvements in design and contruction. He modified the Valk into the Zeevalk with a spade rudder and fin keel.

In 1955, Van de Stadt started experimenting with fiberglass. He designed and built a 30′ fiberglass sailboat called the Pionier. He embraced fiberglass contruction. In 1960, he introduced the first Maxi ocean racer, the 70′ Storm Vogel.

In 1973, Van de Stadt sold the yard but kept the design studio. In 1978, Ricus retired leaving the design studio to associates. In 1999, Ricus passed away at 89 years old. Today, Van de Stadt is a famous custom design studio. They have an excellent reputation for fast, modern designs of luxury sailboats, Maxi ocean racers of aluminum or fiberglass contruction.

December 24, 2009

Bruce Roberts Review

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: — Richard Jordan @ 2:07 pm

The worst boats are home-built, and the best boats are home-built. – Common Saying

Bruce Roberts boats are either extraordinary or awful. Bruce Roberts is an Australian designer who sells his designs directly to the public. Also, he’s sold many to professional builders since 1966 when he and Andrew Slorach opened the first office in Australia. Bruce says, “Over the past 41 years many boats have been built to our plans and branded with the professional builders names … as you know builders come and go … even some of the biggies lately.” Bruce Roberts keeps going strong booked with production and commercial design work until mid 2010. Continue reading “Bruce Roberts Review” »

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »
"After closing the selling of our 40 ft sail vessel "PELICAN" we want to thank you very heartfelt. In an amazing short time of six weeks it succeeded you in bringing the vessel on the market and to sell it also. With a founded knowledge relative to the amercan laws and registration of dinghi and vessel - still the boat was sailed under German Flag - you have managed to coordinate the officials with the american laws in this short time, so that we saved much trouble. Even for the procurement of some trifles or the replacement of a new main sail, what was important for the selling your broker felt responsible and he drove me to the single shops. Respect for so much action! We can recommend all people Jordan`s Yacht Brokerage., which was very helpfull just for us Germans. And the money was on our account punctually." - PL & LL, SV Pelican