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October 28, 2009

SE 17th Street Causeway (Commodore Brook/Clay E. Shaw) – Fort Lauderdale Intracoastal Bridges

Filed under: Navigating — Tags: , , , — Richard Jordan @ 7:34 pm

The Clay E. Shaw Bridge crosses the ICW from the Commodore Brook Memorial Causeway to A1A

The Southeast 17th Street bridge is a bascule drawbridge located just north of the Port Everglades cut. The causeway goes from the westside off US1/Federal Highway eastward over the ICW and twists northward becoming A1A along the Fort Lauderdale beach. The western approach is known as the Commodore Brook Causeway while the actual bridge is named after Clay Shaw. The State of Florida maintains her along with other ICW crossing bridges.

  • Vertical Clearance: 55′ (at high tide)
  • Horizontal Clearance: 125′
  • Depth: ~20 ft
  • Tide Shift: 2 ft every 6 hours with 2 knot current
  • Year Built: 1998-2002
  • Traffic Lanes: 4
  • Openings: Half and whole hour
  • Closed: 7:30-9:00 AM and from 4:30 to 6:00 PM, M-F during rush hour traffic
  • Tender: VHF Channel 9
  • State maintained: (954) 486-1400

Continue reading “SE 17th Street Causeway (Commodore Brook/Clay E. Shaw) – Fort Lauderdale Intracoastal Bridges” »

October 27, 2009

Hylas Yachts Review: A Jordan Yachts Perspective

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 3:09 pm

Due to time and inherent bias, I remember Hylas history through a somewhat colored view. Despite these limitations and my failings as a writer, I hope the following account provides value to people interested in these fine yachts.

Hylas, in Greek mythology, was a courageous youth who accompanied Hercules on the cruise of the Argonauts.  He symbolizes our fine sailing yachts.

Hylas, in Greek mythology, was a courageous youth who accompanied Hercules on the cruise of the Argonauts. He symbolizes our fine sailing yachts.

In the late 1970’s, Joseph Huang opened the Queen Long yard in Taiwan. Jack Kelly contracted them to build the Kelly Peterson 44/46. In 1981 building on their success with Kelly Yachts, Mr. Huang approached Sparkman & Stephens to design a 47′ sailboat. He left the design completely up to S&S. When Bill Stevens heard about the S&S 47 design, he ordered as many as he could and slapped his name on the boat, the Stevens 47. Bill Stevens ran Stevens Yacht Charters and had been buying Peterson 44’s from Queen Long. Many people confuse her as named after Rod Stephens of S&S, but the correct spelling is the Stevens 47. She was well built and designed, fast with a skeg rudder/fin keel, and roomy with three staterooms. And although a financial success as one, she was much more than a charter boat.

In 1984, building on his success, Mr. Huang asked German Frers to design the Hylas 42 and the Hylas 44. He coupled these designs with the successful Stevens 47, branding them “Hylas” after the Greek mythological youth who accompanied Hercules on the cruise of the Argonuats. “This daring youth symbolizes our fine yachts,” goes a vintage Hylas brochure. The Hylas 44 became popular for chartering. In response to feedback, Queen Long modified her. After the first thirteen hulls, Queen Long enlarged the cockpit. The enlarged cockpit provided more comfortable cockpit room for Caribbean cruising. Continue reading “Hylas Yachts Review: A Jordan Yachts Perspective” »

September 19, 2009

Boat Stays, Shrouds Types – Wire, Rod Rigging

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , — Richard Jordan @ 7:16 pm

Rigging holds up spars. Rigging consists of forestays, backstays, shrouds. The rigging material can be either wire or rod. Continue reading “Boat Stays, Shrouds Types – Wire, Rod Rigging” »

Stern Styles and Transom Types – Sugar Scoop, Reverse, Wineglass, Heartshaped, Canoe, Double Ended, Ducktail

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , — Richard Jordan @ 5:18 pm
Boat Sterns (Understanding Boat Design by Ted Brewer)

Boat Sterns (Understanding Boat Design by Ted Brewer)

Some main types are the raked, flat, canoe, and reverse. Continue reading “Stern Styles and Transom Types – Sugar Scoop, Reverse, Wineglass, Heartshaped, Canoe, Double Ended, Ducktail” »

Boat Anchor Types – Plow, Fluke, Claw

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 5:15 pm

Anchors secure a boat to the bottom. Anchors have rode (rope or chain) that runs from the anchor to the chain locker and bitter end attaching to the hull. The generally rest of a bow roller ready for deployment. Anchors come in three common types: plow, fluke, and claw. Continue reading “Boat Anchor Types – Plow, Fluke, Claw” »

Main Sail Furling Systems – Standard, In-mast, In-boom

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 4:00 pm

Roller Reefing Spruce Boom

The way you stow your sails is an old problem dating back to the beginning of sailing. As far back as you research, sailors have experimented with various ways to facilitate head and main sail control. Lazy jacks are a good example of an ancient idea used for many centuries named after British maritime nickname of “jacks.” Whatever their orientation, lazy jacks essentially are two webs of lines on either side of the main which corral when de-powering and ease mainsail flaking. Another example is slab reefing where you tie down the mainsail at tack and clew reef cringles with a reef line run through the clew reef cringle and possibly another tack reef line. Before modern rigs, mariners experimented with all types of reefing, flaking, and even furling systems. Continue reading “Main Sail Furling Systems – Standard, In-mast, In-boom” »

Anchor Windlass Types – Vertical, Horizonal, Capstan

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , , , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 2:50 pm
Shows the parts of a windlass setup (Wikipedia)

Shows the parts of a windlass setup (Wikipedia)

Anchor windlasses let out and retrieve anchors. A windlass manages the rode (chain and/or rope) which attaches the anchor to the bitter end of the hull. The windlass neatly dispenses out and draws back in the rode. The bitter end is a fixture in the forward chain locker. The rode attaches one end to the fixture and travels up through a spill hole, hawser hole, up to the windlass. The rode then wraps around the wheel of the windlass. The wheel is known as variously: gypsy, wildcat, chainwheel, or warping head. The wheel engages the rode for letting out and drawing in. Finally, the rode goes out the windlass wheel, over the bow roller, and attaches to the anchor. The windlass wheel can orient horizontally or vertically. The horizontal way is called a windlass, the vertical a capstan. We assume the windlass as electrically powered. Continue reading “Anchor Windlass Types – Vertical, Horizonal, Capstan” »

Sailboat Rudder Types – Full, Spade, Skeg, Outboard

Filed under: Yachting — Tags: , , — Richard Jordan @ 1:27 pm

The four rudder types are: full, spade, skeg, and outboard. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each. Continue reading “Sailboat Rudder Types – Full, Spade, Skeg, Outboard” »

September 8, 2009

C&C 38 Landfall Review: Racer is Real Cruiser

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 2:13 pm

Landfall 38 PDF Brochure (Click to Download)

In 1969, C&C officially formed. The four principles: Hinterhoeller Ltd., Belleville Marine Yard Ltd., Cuthbertson & Cassian, and Bruckmann. Ian Morch of Belleville was president. Cuthbertson ran design, Hinterhoeller production, and Bruckmann commissioning. After in fighting in 1973, Cuthbertson became president. Robbie Ball headed the design studio. Cuthbertson ran C&C and produced fast, sleek racers and racer/cruisers. C&C became an industry leader and the pride of Canada boating. Victory after victory with boats like Red Jacket increased the brand’s fame. But Cuthbertson had an awakening in 1977. These racers are fickle and not for the masses. He realized the big market was in cruisers. He decided to start the Landfall series. In 1979, Cassian would have a hard attack and die. Then, a corporate take over of C&C took place. Finally by 1986, C&C was in receivership. During this period, they built the 38 C&C Landfall. What a era and what a boat. Continue reading “C&C 38 Landfall Review: Racer is Real Cruiser” »

Valiant 40 Review: The Original Performance Cruiser

Filed under: Reviews — Tags: , , , , , — Richard Jordan @ 2:12 pm

Valiant 40 PDF Brochure (Click to Download)

The Valiant 40 is known as the first performance cruiser. Valiant started when Bob Perry, Nathan Rotham, and the Dabneys met. The Dabneys were looking for a fast cruising design instead of the Westsail 32 genre. The Westsail 32 is a great cruiser but also a “wet slug” – slow in light airs. Perry was an up and coming designer, and Rotham an ambitious business kid. In 1972, they stumbled together at Jay Benford’s Ferrocement boatyard. Soon later, they were talking design. The Dabneys had an Islander 36, a fast sloop. Their dream boat was a cruiser with the performance of their Islander. Perry had been thinking along the same way for some time. Why do all cruising boats have to be slow? Dabney, Perry, and Rothman struck across a Scandanavian boat “Holga Dansk” in Soundings magazine. Perry started drawing the lines with the Dabneys input. By 1974, Perry was ready. The Dabneys wanted one built. And Rotham was looking for resin. Continue reading “Valiant 40 Review: The Original Performance Cruiser” »

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"Dear Tom, I want to take this opportunity to thank you, and Jordan Yachts, for listing and selling our latest yacht. Our relationship has spanned over 20 years. We met you for the first time at the Newport Boat Show in the early 1990s. In 1994 you sold us a Stephens 47 cutter that we lived aboard until 1998. You personally installed a holding tank for us on the Stevens. You sold that boat in 1999 for 10k more than we paid for it. In 2003 we found a Bristol 41.1 on Yacht World located in the Sarasota, FL area and brought you in on the boat inspection, and eventual sale, because we trusted you and valued your thoughts and opinions. Because of your work, we negotiated an acceptable deal. You even helped us bring the boat from Sarasota to Ft. Lauderdale. We’ve enjoyed our time with the Bristol for 12 years and decided last December to put her on the market. We were in N Palm Beach at the time and you came up from Ft. Lauderdale to visit and to see what we had done to the boat over the years we had owned her. Last May, after our final cruise to the Bahamas, you came to our marina in SC to list and photograph our boat. The pictures and video you provided to Yacht World were critical in getting the buyers here from the Atlanta, GA area to view, and eventually purchase the boat. The coordination and support provided by Kathy at Jordan Yachts made the whole process seamless. Unfortunately, at age 76, my sailing days in “big” boats are over, but wanted to thank you and Jordan Yachts for providing expert and professional help in finding, and eventually selling for us, quality sailboats over the last 20 years." - PJ, S/V Dreamseeker 2